Followers

Monday, July 16, 2018

Tim Mee vs BMC DK vs Copy


The figure on the right is the new BMC recast of the old DK copy of the Tim Mee figures original figure.  The figure on the left is another copy of the Tim Mee original from an unknown manufacturer.  See how small the figure on the left appears to the BMC DK figure?  Recasts are the same figures from the same mold and are no different from the original figures.  Copies tend to be smaller, and thinner and have less detail than originals, but that depends in part on how they are made.  Copies are often made to be less expensive and so little time is spent to try and preserve detail and they want the figures to us less plastic, because it's cheaper.


This line up from left to right is the copy, BMC, and Tim Mee original from 40+ years ago.  Note the Tim Mee figure is the largest.


Grenade thrower, Tim Mee, BMC and copy.  Hard to tell in this pose but they get smaller as they go along.


Side by side you can see the Tim Mee original figure is larger than the BMC.  However, note the detail is very good on the BMC figure and he is nice and thick.


 Tim Mee on the left, BMC in the center and copy on the right.  Smaller as they go along.  Still, even these copies are not too bad and the BMC figures are very good.  I think mixing the three works very well and they give a slightly different look to otherwise identical figures.


Minesweepers, Tim Mee, BMC, and copy figure.  There are even a few subtle improvements to the BMC figures that I will show in greater detail.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

BMC DK Tim Mee


BMC sent me these to review.  Tim Mee made figures like this for over a decade starting in about 1948.  They were copied by a company called DK and some other company; that was common in the toy soldier world, even today.




The Tim Mee mold is lost, but the DK mold still exists.  BMC is offering these figures re-cast from the DK mold, brand new.


There is almost no flash, and the mold cavity fills very well.
This guy and the officer are two of my three favorite Tim Mee soldier poses.


Just handling these figures in isolation, I would have been certain they are the Tim Mee figures.


This new plastic is like that used on the BMC Lido re-casts, and I like it a lot.


You don't get all the poses Tim Mee made, only their first series of about four releases.


Still, the most basic figure poses are here and they really are the bulk of  your army.


The Tim Mee originals are 60mm these are a couple millimeters shorter, maybe 58mm.


I am happy with these guys and I got two bags of them.  If you don't already have a ton of the Tim Mee originals, get more of these. If you do have a ton of the Tim Mee originals, get a few of these.


I have always liked this pose, he really has a good cheek weld on the rifle and he really looks like he is aiming and firing it.

The radio man has the long antenna, I like it.


Finally the crawling guy.  I often use him as the loader for the machine gunner.

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Farm House and Troops






The BMC farmhouse and the BMC infantry work well together.

 I like how the weapons stick out the windows easily, not too high for the low troops and not too low for the tall troops.


There is a second story, sort of a loft inside the model.


There is plenty of room from the troops and they stand up well here.


Rifle out the window, very Hollywood, in reality, keep inside so you are harder for the enemy to see and to hit.


I like the big windows all around.


The pistol shooter fires out the window.


The charging man bayonets out the window.  Not usually an effective tactic.


The BMC accessories fit nicely with this model.


Machine gun on the second floor.  Looks like an episode of Combat!


The farmhouse is pretty big so two machine guns can operate on the second floor.






The space inside is large enough for my big hands to reach in and move the troops around.


I like this model, it also comes in tan.  https://victorybuy.com/collections/bmc-toys/products/bmc-farm-house-red

Friday, July 13, 2018

BMC Farmhouse


BMC sent me this farm house to review, it's 54 / 60mm size.


I have heard in the past that this farmhouse is hard to put together, but they have made changes and I found it went right together, without glue, very easily.


 It's a typical generic farmhouse and would work from about Roman times until two years from now.


It reminds me of the farm house in the movie "To Hell and Back" with Audie Murphy.


The Americans and Germans go back and fourth attacking, seizing, defending, and losing the farmhouse.


German tactics were to counter attack before a proper defense could be prepared.


So it was not unusual for a particular objective to be won and lost and won again, sometimes many times before the US finally captured it for good.


Here is the house with some BMC troops in 60mm for size.


The house had zero flash and goes together well.


It's very sturdy and has good play value.


I won't paint it, but I think it would paint up really well, the walls are nicely textured.


There is no ground floor.  The troops fit the windows well.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Weapons and Crews


Here are the BMC figures with the BMC accessories.  The prone figures work well with the bazooka.  It was typically issued as a separate weapon and assigned to regular riflemen.


Light machine gun.  These models have essentially zero flash and go together easily with only two parts, the tripod and the weapon.


The heavy air cooled machine gun.


The recoilless rifle.

https://victorybuy.com/collections/bmc-toys/products/bmc-classic-marx-army-camp-olive 

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Heavy Weapons


In late World War Two the US Army developed a recoilless rifle that mounted on the same tripod as the .30 caliber machine gun.


This weapon is the M20 75mm recoilless rifle.  It fires an artillery shell rather than the anti-tank shell of a bazooka.  It's armor penetration was poor, but it was excellent for firing at pillboxes and bunkers.


This is the .30 caliber machine gun, used by the US Army from World War Two until the 1960's.


It is air cooled and mounted on a tripod.  It can't fire the sustained fire of the water cooled machine gun, but it's much lighter.


This is the .30 caliber water cooled machine gun and in this configuration weighed over 100 pounds.


The chief advantage of this weapon is that as long as you keep water in the cooling jacket and ammunition in the feeder, it will fire continuously. 


These are the heavy weapons that would be found in an American late World War Two battalion and continued in use in the Regular Army at least until well after the Korean War and in Reserve and National Guard units at least a decade later.  


All of these weapons saw service with the US Army in World War Two, Korea, and Vietnam.  Allied forces used them even longer and the Communist Chinese even copied the recolless rifle!